Milo's Dog Training

Dog training in Hampshire, Surrey & Berkshire


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Three Quick & Easy Changes To Improve Your Dog’s Behaviour

Sometimes, you put up with some really annoying behaviour simply because fixing it it seems like too much to do. You might not know where to start or which method to choose. You might not have the time or the energy to invest. So I have decided to share these three quick and easy changes you can make straight away – no preparation, no learning, no researching. These are small changes with big effects. Now, don’t get me wrong, some issues do require a lot of time and effort, but do start with the small changes and it might just be enough.

Have treats ready. Put a bowl of treats in every room and get a treat pouch to carry some with you when you go for a walk. This way you will always be ready to reward good behaviour. No need to do “training sessions”, best training opportunities happen as you get on with your normal life.

Make a habit of ignoring rude behaviour. Your dog barks, begs, demands to play – ignore it. Catch yourself before you say “No!”, “Stop it!”or, worse, pick up a toy. Don’t reinforce rudeness.

Add 10 minutes to your usual walk. Tired dogs are good. You can use this extra time to do a bit of training or to change your usual way. Your dog will appreciate some new smells or some extra bonding time with you.

Small changes will add up overtime and you will see that your dog is more content and better behaved. (If you are looking for solutions for specific issues, check out “Training Resources” page or contact me).

 


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A Guide to Your New Puppy

Not sure what to do with your new pup? Once you are able to resist the cuteness of your new family member, it is time to start training. Dogs can be trained from an early age, so begin teaching your puppy about your expectations and the world around them as soon as he or she arrives in your home. The sooner you begin teaching them good manners and social skills, the easier it will be for you when they hit the difficult period of adolescence.

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Lead Aggression. Part 4: Triggers.

This is the last part of a series of posts on lead aggression. Please read parts 1, 2 & 3 first.

Think about a recent situation, which involved you seeing another owner walking towards you and your dog. What was your reaction? Did you hold your breath for a moment? Maybe you tightened your grip on the lead? Probably, you even pulled the lead a bit or started talking to your dog. Chances are, you did all three and something else, if you were walking a dog that is reactive on lead. The behaviours are not themselves a problem. The issues arise, when your dog learns to associate them with other dogs approaching him. After that you are trapped in a vicious cycle:

In addition to your behaviour and body language, there are other possible triggers for your dog. A common trigger is a certain type of dogs. For example, your dog has been attacked by a large white dog and will display aggression towards similar looking dogs. Another possible trigger is a certain place. For example, your dog may only react to other dogs on a narrow pathway or on a certain street corner.

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Lead Aggression. Part 3: Perception of Other Dogs

This is the third part from a series of posts on lead aggression. Please read parts 1 and 2 first.

Lead aggression is directly related to the dog’s perception of other dogs. Whether it is a learned bad habit or a result of a traumatic experience, aggressive or overly excited behaviour is a reaction to the presence of other dogs. Hence, you will have to change your dog’s associations with other dogs and to teach him an alternative behaviour.

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Lead Aggression. Part 1.

Do you find yourself hiding from other dogs during walks? Keep reading then. One of the most common complaints among dog owners is related to the so-called “lead aggression”. If your dog is lead-aggressive or lead-reactive, your walks can become a nightmare and a source of constant embarrassment. The most frustrating thing for me is to see this on the streets, while I know, that it can be easily corrected. When I say “easily”, I don’t mean “overnight” or “by a wave of a magic wand” kind of “easily”. What I mean is that this issue is curable with some simple adjustments, re-conditioning and commitment.

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How to housebreak a dog (puppy or adult).

As the excitement of bringing home a new puppy wears off, many owners face an annoying task of cleaning up the accidents and housetraining. The sooner you start teaching your dog appropriate toilet behaviour the better.  If you are lucky to have a garden or at least to live on the ground floor, you task is much easier. But don’t worry; living in a flat shouldn’t be a problem.

Most owners will face the task of housebreaking only once in their dogs lifetime. However, sometimes stress, moving to a new house or illness can cause problems in adult dogs as well. This post will cover the main principles of housetraining, which apply to both puppies and adult dogs.

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The Three Bases of Dog Training

I’ll be honest: dog training is not that complicated. There is a limited number of tools that every dog owner can learn. The only difference between an experienced dog trainer and an owner is that the trainer is used to spotting opportunities and creative ways of applying the tools. Alright, we, dog trainers, also have experience and theoretical knowledge that allows us to apply our tools to different cases. However, I am convinced that any person can learn to apply the basic tools to their own dog. That is why I would like to share with you the three most important principles of dog training, on which the major part of dog training is based.

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