Milo's Dog Training

Dog training in Hampshire, Surrey & Berkshire


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Training Mila. Weeks 4-5.

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This is what we were supposed to do according to the plan.

Week 4:

  • Lead skills: people or dogs at a close distance
  • Recall: off the lead, people or dogs at a close distance

Week 5: 

  • Lead skills: near people or dogs
  • Recall: on the lead, near people or dogs

What can I say? At least, we’re trying. We have been enjoying gorgeous summer weather for the last few weeks, however it has often been to hot for the dogs to be out during the day. So we had very few opportunities for training in presence of other dogs or people. We are still very much behind with lead skills, but doing a little bit better with recall.

Socialisation

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Due to the heat I haven’t been able to take Mila out with us as much as I’d like. We managed a few walks together and even went down the high street a couple times. I must say that Mila is doing better than expected in the crowd. She calms down quickly and isn’t trying to kiss every single person on the street – that’s progress. However, she barely responds to us, so we have a long way to go.

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Puppy Schnauzer Dog Playing Training

I fear that Edenbrook Country Park regulars will soon be fleeing the scene as soon as they spot us. When I take Mila for a walk my goal is to meet as many people and dogs as possible, so I constantly follow people and change directions if I spot someone with a dog.

Lead Skills

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My husband reports that he is making progress with Mila: she began to walk by his side for a few moments. However, it seems that this only happens in the evenings. Whenever I take her out during the day, she still finds it incredibly hard to concentrate and control herself. Well, like I said, at least we’re trying.

Recall

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Puppy Schnauzer Dog Playing Training

I’ve been letting her off the lead in the park when I can’t see any dogs or people around. I am very pleased that Mila tends to hang around and doesn’t run off (unless she spots someone). She will come when called and so far I’ve managed to notice dogs and people before she did and to put her on the lead. So I now feel a lot more confident about letting her off the lead.

Overall, I am quite pleased with our progress so far. However, I wanted to say this to my readers who are also struggling with their puppies: I struggle too! I do sometimes question our decision to get another dog (especially when I catch her destroying the sandpit or when she does this very annoying jumping/air snapping/barking routine). I believe that, similar to new mothers, puppy owners sometimes need to hear that it is OK to be frustrated. Raising a puppy is hard work, it requires a lot of energy, a lot of time and a whole lot of patience. But I keep saying to myself that in a few difficult months I (and more importantly – my daughter) will have a loyal companion for years to come. It makes my heart melt when I see Sonya and Mila kissing or playing together (Mila puts up with a lot!). I think I can live with a wrecked sandpit and approximately zero personal time.


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Training Mila: The Plan

As I mentioned, we haven’t really started training her until last week. I wasn’t feeling well, we were busy and, let’s be honest, we were lazy about it. Also having a toddler who finds clickers irresistible doesn’t particularly help. A couple of weeks ago we decided that we are going to take Mila on holiday with us in July, so training has suddenly became a matter of urgency. Also she is four months now, so I couldn’t justify any more delays.

To begin with, I came up with a weekly plan to guide and motivate us. I find it easier to follow a plan rather then needing to thing about what should I do next. It also helps me and my husband to stay on the same page. Mila’s training plan is for six weeks (time remaining until our holiday) and it is mainly targeting socialising, lead skills and recall. I find these skills the essentials, which enable owners to relax and enjoy having a dog. I personally don’t want to spend time (at least not at the moment) on teaching her any tricks, downs, waits etc. These are nice to have, but I can do it later.

So here is the plan.

Week 1:

Week 2: 

  • Lead skills: no people or dogs around
  • Recall: on lead, people or dogs at a distance

Week 3:

  • Relaxation mat
  • Lead skills: people or dogs at a distance
  • Recall:
    • off the lead, no people or dogs around
    • on the lead, people or dogs at a close distance

Week 4:

  • Lead skills: people or dogs at a close distance
  • Recall: off the lead, people or dogs at a close distance

Week 5: 

  • Lead skills: near people or dogs
  • Recall: on the lead, near people or dogs

Week 6:

  • Lead skills: in a crowded place
  • Recall: off the lead, near people or dogs

A quick note on what I mean by various distances.

  • “At a distance” – distractions are visible but far enough for the dog to be able to completely ignore them in the beginning of the training process.
  • “At a close distance” – distractions are far enough for the dog to get a little excited, but still being able to keep focused.
  • “Near” – you are able to talk the person without shouting
  • “Crowded” – a busy street, pub, cafe, park, any other public space with people going around their business, cars, pushchairs, dogs etc.


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How to prepare for a baby when you have a dog

Dogs generally don’t like change, and a new strange family member is the biggest change that could happen to them. Changes in the new mother’s appearance, smell, mood and behaviour, a sudden drop in attention available for the dog, countless visitors, sleepless nights and other disturbances to the usual way of life are all sources of stress for the dog. Any behavioural issues will likely be made worse by the stress, and you can expect new problems emerging. I will share a few practical tips on how to prepare for  your baby’s arrival as a dog owner.

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Moving house? Help your dog deal with it.

Last week Milo had to endure yet another house move. He changed countries three times during the seven and half years of his life, and this move was his fifth house move. Despite being used to it, Milo hates moving. It seems that it isn’t the prospect of a new place that annoys him (after all, I don’t think he actually knows about our plans for a new home), but rather the whole process of packing, moving and disassembling furniture, things disappearing from their usual places and, no doubt, our stress.  Milo’s way of expressing anxiety and frustration is stealing and guarding various things. In addition, his allergy always flares up when he is stressed.

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Lead Reactive Dogs – 1: Where To Start?

Do you find yourself hiding from other dogs during walks? Keep reading then. One of the most common complaints among dog owners is related to the so-called “lead aggression”. If your dog is lead-aggressive or lead-reactive, your walks can become a nightmare and a source of constant embarrassment. The most frustrating thing for me is to see this on the streets, while I know, that it can be easily corrected. When I say “easily”, I don’t mean “overnight” or “by a wave of a magic wand” kind of “easily”. What I mean is that this issue is curable with some simple adjustments, re-conditioning and commitment.

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